The Antonine Wall

There’s something for everyone along the line of the Antonine Wall – for Roman enthusiasts, keen walkers, cyclists, families and day trippers.

Nearly 2,000 years ago, the Antonine Wall was the north-west frontier of the Roman Empire. Built on the orders of the Emperor Antoninus Pius in the years following AD 140, it ran for 40 Roman miles (60 km) from modern Bo’ness on the Firth of Forth to Old Kilpatrick on the River Clyde.

Over time, the industrial and commercial heartland of Scotland has grown around it yet, unbelievably, one-third of its total length is still visible today. Archaeological excavations have demonstrated that much of the rest survives well beneath both fields and urban areas.

In 2008 it was inscribed as a World Heritage Site, becoming part of the Frontiers of the Roman Empire World Heritage Site, alongside Hadrian’s Wall and the German Limes.

There’s something for everyone along the line of the Antonine Wall – for Roman enthusiasts, keen walkers, cyclists, families and day trippers.

Discover the Antonine Wall