Crinan Canal

1771

James Watt surveys the area to find a course for the canal

Crinan Canal

1773

The Crinan Canal Act is passed and James Paterson is appointed as resident engineer

Crinan Canal

1805

A section of the canal bank fails, 3 miles north of Ardrishaig. The course of the canal is altered

Crinan Canal

1809

With the help of government loans and additional funding, reservoirs are completed and the canal now has an adequate supply of water. The canal opens for business

Crinan Canal

1811

A violent storm bursts the banks of the main reservoir, with millions of gallons of water and hundreds of tons of rock, boulders, peat and mud wrecking locks, pounds, public roads and canal banks

Crinan Canal

1854

33,000 passengers, 27,000 sheep and 2,000 cattle have been transported through the canal

Crinan Canal

1847

Queen Victoria and her family sail through the canal and by 1857, 44,000 passengers are arriving at Ardrishaig to take the ‘Royal Route’

Crinan Canal

1866

A specially designed steamer ‘The Linnet’ is launched to cope with the demand and to replace the horse drawn barges operating the route. The Linnet runs until 1929

Crinan Canal

1930

New sea locks are built at either end of the canal to allow easier access for boats

Crinan Canal

1939

The outbreak of WWII and the canal is ordered to turn its navigation lights off. This blackout measure was a response to the threat of Hitler’s Luftwaffe

Crinan Canal

21st century

The Crinan Canal is mainly used by visiting yachts and fishing vessels enjoying the most beautiful shortcut in the world