Forth & Clyde Canal

1763

Civil Engineer, John Smeaton surveys a route for the Forth & Clyde Canal

Forth & Clyde Canal

1768

Construction of the privately-owned Forth & Clyde Canal is approved by an Act of Parliament

Forth & Clyde Canal

1768

Work begins in June when the governor of the Canal Company digs the first spade-full at the Eastern sea lock. Over the years this area has grown into what is now known as Grangemouth

Forth & Clyde Canal

1775

Work stops just North of Glasgow due to a lack of funds

Forth & Clyde Canal

1777

City merchants raise money to build a branch of the canal into the city

Forth & Clyde Canal

1785

Government money forfeited from the Jacobite Estates is available and the canal continues its journey to the River Clyde at Bowling

Forth & Clyde Canal

1790

The Forth & Clyde Canal is opened

Forth & Clyde Canal

1867

The canal is bought by the Caledonian Railway Company

Forth & Clyde Canal

1923

Caledonian Railway Company is absorbed into London Midland and Scottish Railway

Forth & Clyde Canal

1948

The canal is nationalised and administered by the British Transport Commission

Forth & Clyde Canal

1962

Rights of navigation are extinguished by Parliament and the canal closes in 1963

Forth & Clyde Canal

2001

The canal is reopened as part of the £83.5m Millennium Link – the largest canal restorations anywhere in Britain

Forth & Clyde Canal

2002

The Falkirk Wheel reconnects the Forth & Clyde and Union Canals for the first time in over 70 years

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