Monkland Canal

1769

The route from Monkland coalfield is surveyed by engineer James Watt in response to the growth of Glasgow and the demand of coal in industry

Monkland Canal

1770

The Monkland Canal Company is formed and construction begins

Monkland Canal

1771

The canal opens progressively, as short sections of canal are completed

Monkland Canal

1773

Moneys runs out and construction stops at Germiston

Monkland Canal

1780

Revenue from shares allow building to resume as far as Blackhill

Monkland Canal

1790-1791

The Forth & Clyde Canal Company funds the ‘Cut of Junction’ connecting the Monkland and Forth & Clyde Canals so they can both benefit from the additional water supply from surrounding rivers

Monkland Canal

1831

The Garnkirk and Glasgow Railway opens. Other railways follow, eventually leading to direct competition with the canal

Monkland Canal

1837

The Monkland Canal is the most profitable canal in Scotland, with income from tolls nearly 4 times its expenditure

Monkland Canal

1846

The canal is taken over by The Forth & Clyde Canal Company

Monkland Canal

1849

The inclined Plane, a system to move boats up and down the hill at Blackhills without the use of Locks, is constructed. The Inclined Plane was designed in 1839 by James Leslie

Monkland Canal

1850

1million tonnes of coal has been transported along the canal

Monkland Canal

1867

The canal is bought by the Caledonian Railway Company

Monkland Canal

1952

The canal is closed to navigation

Monkland Canal

1960s

The canal is gradually filled in to make way for the construction of the M8 in Glasgow and new developments in Coatbridge

Monkland Canal

21st Century

Drumpelier Park and Calderbank are still in water and are popular locations for nature and wildlife as well as leisure visitors